Criminology and Sociology

Units available in the area of Criminology and Sociology, as part of the Bachelor of Criminology and Justice degree.

 

Applied Criminology
Core unit

This unit will introduce you to the study of crime and criminal behaviour and the uses of this knowledge in forming government policies and prevention strategies.

You will evaluate the validity of criminal statistics and examine the prevalence of specific crimes in Australia as well as examining the evolution of crime and criminal behaviour. As part of the unit you will also examine specific areas of criminal behaviour such as crimes of violence, white collar and corporate crime, organised crime, arson, and property offences.

Throughout the unit, students will actively participate in application and critical discussion of criminological theories.

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Corporate Crime
Elective unit

This unit will introduce you to corporate or 'white collar' crime at both the State and Federal levels within Australia including defining and describing the various offences that may be classified under the banner of 'corporate crime'.

The unit will examine the main types of occupational crime within the Australian criminal justice landscape, these being the benefit of employer, the result of State-based authority, professionals misusing their capacity, and individuals for personal gain.

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Criminal Justice
Core unit

The unit provides an outline of the historical development of the criminal justice system. Attention is given to the manner in which criminal statistics are assessed and how such evidence can be interpreted. The student will be required to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the use of statistical data in analysing criminal justice. The unit will then proceed to examine the process of the criminal justice system in light of the current legislative and common law framework and that of community expectations. The student will critically assess the need for clear principles and policies for Australian criminal justice. This will include identifying the actual aims of the criminal justice system, as well as a critical examination of the accountability mechanisms and performance measures of each criminal justice agency.

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Cultural Diversity
Core unit

Australia is a country with a diverse cultural population, this unit will introduce you to modern-day issues surrounding cultural diversity on the Australian criminal justice system.

You will be provided with an overview of the concept of culture and cultural diversity, including the relationship between culture and society. You will be able to define culture and consider the concept of culture within the Australian criminal justice system.

You will also investigate the major impacts and influences on the operation of the criminal justice system in its dealing with diverse communities.

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Deviance
Elective unit

When you complete this unit you will be introduced to a range of deviant behaviour in society and you will critically examine each one. You will be taught the major approaches to the control of deviant behaviour as well as examining the nature of deviant behaviour and you will understand how to differentiate between abnormality and deviancy.

As an NCPS student completing this unit, you will critically examine the nature of crime, deviance and corresponding reactions from society. You will also review real case studies which involve actual events where strategies had varying degrees of success and failure.

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Ethics
Core unit

During this unit you will discover the moral bases of the law and ethical standards to professional behaviour for people working within the criminal justice sector.

You will learn about the connections between the morality and law, and define the notions of rights and duties, obligation and responsibility, justice and justification. You will examine the argument that there is a moral obligation to obey the law even where the law may be deemed to be ineffective or unethical.

While studying this unit you will be introduced to the features of various codes of ethics in the criminal justice field and related areas. Such areas will include 'Ethical Standards of Psychologists', the 'Code of Ethics' adopted by Human Services Workers, Code of Ethics for guidance of Police and various codes relevant to the corrections field.

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Indigenous Peoples and Justice
Core unit

The unit will introduce students to the concept of first nation peoples in Australia and worldwide. It will explore early indigenous culture, kinship relationships, and the significance of spirituality, customary law and the impacts of colonialisation. The social, political and moral implications of the imposition of a non-indigenous governance system on indigenous peoples will be addressed.

Students will explore specific periods of Australian history to seek areas of greatest impact on indigenous culture and lifestyle. In doing so, the unit will identify key decisions like ―Mabo‖ and ―Wik‖ and abiding issues such as the stolen generations to explain the changing attitudes of society to indigenous peoples, land rights and self-determination. Students will deconstruct the high rates of mortality and morbidity experienced by indigenous peoples, as well as the numerous issues indigenous peoples encounter when coming into contact with the criminal justice system (CJS). Specifically, the unit will examine the over-representation of indigenous peoples within the CJS and strategies employed to overcome this, including those recommended by the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody.

The unit will conclude with a reflection on culturally appropriate initiatives to create opportunities for self-determination.

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Issues in Criminal Justice
Core unit

Students will engage with a variety of themes which highlight the dynamic nature of justice and the law, in general, and criminal justice in particular. The focus for this topic assists students to understand that as society adapts to change in social attitudes, new threats and risks, so too must the criminal justice system seek to match social trends in its responses to crime and criminality.

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Theoretical Criminology
Core unit

Theoretical Criminology will introduce you to the theories common in criminological thought, and will provide information that will enable you to critically evaluate these theories.

During this unit you will learn about the historical development of criminology as well as the origins and concepts of the Classical and Neo-Classical schools of criminology.

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Transnational Crime
Core unit

The unit will begin by introducing the student to the concept of transnational crime and by defining and distinguishing the various offences that may be classified as such. The global context in which these activities occur will be identified, with specific attention paid to globalisation and modernisation processes. Students will also be introduced to the broader contexts and impacts of these activities, including the social, legal, economic and political arenas.

The unit will examine the main forms of transnational crime, focusing on the illegitimate economy and ‗black market‘ and ‗grey market‘ trade. Key offences examined include illegal trade of: arms; licit and illicit substances; and human beings. Throughout, students will analyse the roles played by organised criminal networks and official corruption in relation to the commission and facilitation of transnational crime.

The unit will critically examine attempts by governments and domestic and global agencies to combat transnational crime, including legislative and enforcement strategies. Students will analyse the effectiveness of governmental and agency attempts to combat transnational crime, with particular attention paid to the difficulties encountered. The unit will conclude by considering future trends in the area of transnational crime, in terms of offending and response.

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Youth Justice
Elective unit

This unit will provide you with a working knowledge of the philosophies, practices and agencies of the Juvenile Justice System.

As part of the unit you will be given an outline of various definitions and debates about young people and their status in society. The notions of competence, criminal responsibility and maturity are identified as central considerations in the youth justice system. The justifications and reasons for separating the adult and youth justice systems are reviewed and explained.

You will also analyse the various services, institutions, sentencing options, and processing pathways that exist for young offenders.

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