Policing and Law Enforcement

Units available in the area of Policing and Law Enforcement, as part of the Bachelor of Criminology and Justice degree.

 

Drugs and Crime
Core unit

This unit will introduce you to the complex relationships between illicit drugs and crime in society.

The unit starts with an historical overview of drugs and drug use and the 'illicit' nature of certain drugs. You will examine the extent of drug use and abuse in Australian society, drug abuse as a social problem, and reasons for drug taking. You will consider issues such as young people and drugs and predictors of drug taking.

You will examine drug-related crime in depth including international issues (organised crime and the drug trade) and drugs in the context of the criminal justice system. With your classmates you will consider if incarceration for drug related offences is an appropriate preventative measure, or if it exacerbates the problem because of the ready supply of drugs within the prison system.

Back to Top

Investigative Processes
Elective unit

The unit commences with an outline of the historical development of the rules of evidence applicable at both the state and Federal levels. It will then trace and examine critically the development of evidential rules regarding both prosecution and defence, including factual issues and rules for admissibility. In particular, the unit will analyse specific themes including: competence and compellability; privilege; hearsay; opinion and expert evidence; public interest, probative and prejudicial issues; the use of disposition and character; confessions; and illegally obtained evidence. The student will also be introduced to evidential perspectives of corroboration, including admissions, alibi, flight and false statements as matters that might impact on a court‘s ultimate determination.

The unit will also focus on the investigative powers of State and Federal police and other public agencies, as well as the investigative practices of the private security industry. The unit will conclude by looking at: the varied use of technology, such as evidence gathering through overt and covert means, including electronic surveillance; the use of interrogations as an investigative tool, including complex psychological issues and reliability; and, balancing fairness for the accused, public interest and civil rights.

Back to Top

Police and Enforcement Studies
Elective unit

Taught be a serving senior Victorian Police member; this unit will introduce you to historical and contemporary issues for police and law enforcement by other statutory agencies.

The unit starts with an overview of the development of statutory authorities, including police, other public enforcement agencies and private providers. You will be introduced to the general roles performed by the more common enforcement agencies, including State and Federal police, Customs, postal, telecommunications, and outsourced functions performed by private industry. You will analyse 'culture' as it applies in various law enforcement agencies and how it can impact on corruption. Case studies will be conducted in controversial areas, such as the Victoria Police window shutter investigation (Operation Bart), the Fitzgerald Inquiry (Queensland) and the work of the Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC; NSW). The unit concludes with an overview of recent initiatives relative to law enforcement.

Back to Top

Terrorism and Society
Core unit

This unit will introduce you to historical and contemporary issues surrounding terrorism, including its impact on the global community.

The unit commences with an overview of the concept of 'terrorism', its development throughout the 20th Century, and the difficulties of attempting to broadly define 'terrorism'. Students will gain an understanding of how globalisation has affected terrorism and will examine attempts to classify, from a psychological viewpoint, those who engage in terrorist activities.

Using case studies, you will address the links between political ideology and terrorism by examining the motivations, objectives and tactics of officially-labelled 'terrorist' groups. The impact of the 11 September 2001 attacks on the US ('9/11') will be examined, as will the responses of government, with a focus on Australia's role. The unit will also consider the responses of the private sector to terrorism, including the areas of airport security and internet security.

As a student completing this unit you will consider future issues raised by terrorism, including the potential for terrorist organisations to use weapons of mass destruction, the extrapolation of governmental policy, and potential issues caused for civil rights.

Back to Top