Psychology and Corrective Services

Units available in the area of Psychology and Corrective Services, as part of the Bachelor of Criminology and Justice degree.

Abnormal Psychology
Core unit

This unit will introduce you to the study of abnormal behaviour within society. The unit outlines the major theories of different behaviours, with particular focus on biological, psychological and psychodynamic theories.

In class you will learn about, and discuss, mental disorders commonly evident within society, including schizophrenia, and the impact of such disorders within the criminal justice system.

The unit will examine modern approaches to mental health and you will learn to differentiate between disorders using appropriate diagnostic tools and classification techniques.

Back to Top

Case Management
Elective unit

If you choose to undertake Case Management you will be introduced to the various issues involved in approaches to punishment, rehabilitation and the control of offenders in the non-prison setting.

You will learn about the development of community-based corrections from an historical and philosophical perspective and how that has evolved into the current relationships today between justice departments such as the courts and the Adult Parole Board.

You will get the opportunity to work with actors playing the part of the offender in a role play setting, putting into practice what you have learnt about offender induction, case management and report writing.

Back to Top

Corrections
Elective unit

This unit will introduce you to the various issues involved in the punishment, rehabilitation and control of inmates in a prison / custodial setting.

You will learn about the development of today’s correctional system both historically and philosophically and examine corrections from the perspectives of different people and groups including; the government, correctional officers, the community and the prisoners themselves.

You will be taught the methods of classification, assessment, management and supervision of prisoners and we will also examine the advantages and disadvantages of alternative measures, such as home detention and electronic monitoring and tagging of sex offenders.

Back to Top

Forensic Psychology
Elective unit

This exciting unit will introduce you to the primary beliefs and central topics within the specialist field of forensic psychology.

Within the unit you will take an in-depth look at the various areas where psychology contributes to the functioning of the justice system and you will understand how psychology’s involvement in the legal system has shaped the criminal justice system. Contemporary theories of offending are outlined and critiqued, and these are linked to the principles that underlie work with forensic clients. As part of the unit you will also be provided with an explanation of the educational and vocational steps that are required if you choose to pursue a career in forensic psychology.

Back to Top

Introduction to Psychology
Core unit

This unit will introduce you to psychology as the science of behaviour and mental processes and addresses psychological activities, such as thinking, perceiving and feeling, and the interpretation of inference as a method to determine mental processes.

You will gain knowledge of the common fields of psychology, including speciality areas of experimental and applied fields both in general practice and within the criminal justice system. You will also take an in-depth look at the stages of basic human development, including nature, nurture and maturation, adolescence, adulthood and ageing as well as critically analysing personality theories, assessment and therapeutic strategies.

Back to Top

Mental Health and Criminal Justice
Elective unit

This unit commences with an exploration of the historical narrative involving mental health and illness, the role of psychiatry within this, and the impact deinstitutionalisation has had on the Mental Health and Criminal Justice systems in Australia.

The unit then explores criminal justice approaches to mental health and related issues affecting the Criminal Justice System (CJS). This includes: legislative frameworks and concepts of cognitive and mental health impairment; the prevalence of mental illness in the CJS; police management of individuals presenting with mental illness; legal defences for, and sentencing of mentally ill offenders; corrections and voluntary and involuntary admission to treatment. The unit will then discuss and critique the current evidence-based treatment approaches used both domestically and internationally including: the prevalent categories of mental illness in the CJS; the barriers to effective treatment, and; a review of systemic issues which impact delivery of treatment. The principles and elements common to mental health systems across Australia will be presented and reviewed, with a specific focus on treatment and management within the CJS.

Back to Top

Victimology
Core unit

Studying Victimology will enable you to examine trends and initiatives that impact upon ‘victims’ in various contexts, with particular reference to the criminal justice system.

Broad trends to move from victim blaming to victim involvement are highlighted, as well as identifying the many issues that emerge when seeking to measure trends in ‘victimhood’. You will learn about the impacts of various types of victimisation including descriptions of recent legislative, policy and agency-level changes.

Back to Top